Category Archives: Politics

NYC Mayor Race 2013: No Jewish Candidates A Sign of Shift in NYC Demographics

As Published on PolicyMic

America’s capital of diversity is experiencing a noticeable absence in its 2013 mayoral election diversity round table. As the prospects for New York City’s upcoming mayoral race come forward, it is beginning to seem more likely that this will be the fourth time since 1965 that there are no significant Jewish American candidates in contention for the seat.

The attention that New Yorkers have given the topic is a clear indication of the importance of race identity and representation to New York City voters. However, while much can be said about this year’s void, it certainly should not detract from the vast landscape in race, gender, and even sexual orientation in the 2013 mayoral election. Instead, New Yorkers should consider the demographic shifts in our City that are being reflected in the historic race.

Earlier this year, I posted an article that highlighted the diversity in NYC’s mayoral race. In this year’s lineup is City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, who is of Irish descent and would be the first female and openly gay mayor; Public Advocate Bill De Blasio, who is of Italian and German descent (and happens to be married to an African American woman); City Comptroller John Lui, who would be the first Taiwanese American mayor; and former Comptroller and 2009 Democrat nominee Bill Thompson Jr., who is black. The only significant GOP hopeful is former Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrión Jr., who would be NYC’s first Latino mayor. This year’s race is indisputably one of the most diverse mayoral elections in NYC, if not the country, and deserves a grin from even the most extreme Tea Partier for its historic implications of our nation’s social progress.

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New York Voting: Hurricane Sandy Displaces Countless Voters in New York City

As Published on PolicyMic

Lines, lines, and more lines.

This morning, my father practiced his 30-years-old Election Day tradition of voting before he typically catches the B6 to work. Much to his surprise, there was a line that went up and down Vermont St. in the heart of East New York.

The result: I got an early morning tirade that woke me up from sleeping in on my day off.

“I swear they’re trying to pull another Gore! This is a travesty! They’re giving out numbers to vote! They can’t stop us from voting! You better find out if this is happening in minority neighborhoods around the country.” Then I went back to sleep.

The answer to his question probably has a lot to do with New York Governor Andrew Cuomo (D) issuing an executive order that gave New Yorkers that were displaced by Sandy permission to vote at any site. So long as you fill out an affidavit on site, you can vote.

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Filed under Environment, Policymic, Politics

NY Election Results: LIVE Hurricane Sandy May Cost Democrats the 11th District Seat on Staten Island

As Published on PolicyMic

Any Democratic Presidential nominee can typically count on banking 29 electoral votes from the Big Apple, but that is not the case for congressional races — especially in Staten Island.

Staten Island has always been viewed as the black sheep in the liberal City polls. In fact, in 2008, John Mccain won 52 percent of the popular vote in Staten Island, while he merely earned 12 percent of the Bronx. But according to the polls, and a stream of NY Times articles, the GOP may be endanger of losing the ultra-conservative 11th District to a political novice. Despite the fact that the 11th district has only sent one Democrat to Congress in 30 years (former City Councilman Mike McMahon, who lost handedly to current incumbent Michael Grimm in 2010 after serving just one one-year term), the GOP incumbent faces a legitimate threat in Mark Murphy following NY Times’ coverage of Grimm’s checkered past. As Democrats battle to reclaim the House, a win against one of the more vulnerable GOP congressman can bring them one seat closer to 218.

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7 Huge Issues You Really Don’t Hear Obama and Romney Talking About, But Matter a Heck of A Lot

As Published on PolicyMic

Every four years, two of the best (or wealthiest) civic servants burn through millions of dollars, hours, trees, and airwaves to convince us that they are going to be the first commander-in-chief to tackle everything that they mention in their ads and debates.

That, of course, has yet to be the case. But at the very least, voters must demand that our elected officials make an earnest effort to take on the issues that are so often passed on to the next administration like a can getting kicked down Main Street. Our best plead for an answer often lies in the two major candidates’ attempt to capture some of the third party votes by slightly tapping into their platforms.

In the meantime, we are left listening to the same unaddressed (if even noted) topics election after election.

That said, here are seven pressing issues that both President Barack Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney have yet to offer an adequate explanation for: Read More

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Obama Has Mixed Record on African American Issues

Much has been made of President Barack Obama’s so called controversial statements in last week’s Black Enterprise magazine. As the Reverend Al Sharpton put it, President Obama finally stood up to his handful of critics from black organizations when he said that he is “not the president of black America. I’m the president of the United States of America.” Still, many segments of the black community continue to ponder whether or not the president takes their vote for granted (as most Democrats do).

 

But one of the major distinctions that I’d like to point out about Obama, and the black vote, is the divide between the vote and the admiration. In many ways, I will always be enamored by Obama the man; the black father with a strong family, the historic figure, the stoic and classy demeanor and the message of hope and change that he sends to blacks who have fallen prey to generational poverty and political complacency. However, Obama the politician is just as vulnerable to the assessment of the black community as the next politician who relies on the black vote…Read More

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New York Primary Results: Charles Barron vs Hakeem Jeffries Fight to Rep Brooklyn

As Published on PolcyMic

The scene surrounding primary elections in Brooklyn is no different than that fiery public speaker who gave out achievement awards at your elementary school graduation — it has huge implications, but stakeholders are too preoccupied and disengaged to realize how it can and will change their futures.

According to an informal NY Daily News’ survey, 61 out of 100 Brooklynites either did not know that there was a primary election coming up or did not plan on voting. In New York’s most heavily populated borough and the country’s 8th most populated county, that is a sad reality for the landscape of statewide and local politics. While we may often hear the lackluster explanation that people abstain from voting because they no longer trust government and/or its effectiveness, that excuse assumes that people are politically conscious enough of policies role in forming their surroundings to make an attentive decision not to vote. But the truth is that people, in fact, do not know when there is an election, who is their incumbent, what they have done and how it has affected their neighborhood.

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Who Should I Vote For In NYC’s Mayor Race? Pick From An NYPD Chief, Lesbian, Asian, African American and … Jon Huntsman

As Published on PolicyMic

As the clock winds down to this year’s election season, New Yorkers are already looking 18 months ahead to what promises to be one of the most interesting and competitive mayoral elections to date. In a city where three-term mayors (Ed Koch and Michael Bloomberg) have dominated the political spectrum for the past few decades, 2013 offers a promising opportunity for new blood and fresh ideas to mix things up in the Big Apple.

The prospects for 2013 is appropriately shaping up to be a diverse, yet nearly equally matched pool of candidates that reflect the uniqueness of the city’s population — other cities across the nation should pay close attention and take notes.

Between a ballooning pension fund that is 499% of what it was in 2002, the controversy of Wal-Mart potentially opening up shop and killing New York’s trademark mom and pop shop business environment, and a police department that is scrutinized by city inhabitants as much as it is hailed by the rest of the nation, there are a myriad of hotbed issues in place for 2013. Here is a brief lineup of some of 2013’s favorites and long shots:

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